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Ike Bancroft

The Farm
On Friday, August 7, we took a field trip to Lincoln, to a vegetable and flower farm called Blue Heron Farm. We met Elroy, Mia, Ana, and Jackson, who work on the farm. They briefed us on everything that grows on the farm, and the kind of work they do. Since it had just rained a lot, there were weeds growing in their vegetable patches, killing off vegetables. The weeds needed to be removed because they were choking the carrots and taking their soil, water, and nutrients. We weeded about a row and a half, and then had lunch. We realized there wasn’t enough time to keep weeding, so we all sat down and talked about the farm, and had questions answered. They explained that the farm was completely organic, and no pesticides were used. They told us about how the farm was owned by the city and was a protected area, meaning that it could never be developed, and would always be a natural space. The only building on their farm was a stand in front in which they sold everything they produced, including vegetables and flowers. On top of selling their crops at their stand, they would also drive them into Boston and sell them to restaurants and at farmers markets. Ellery also explained the importance of having a diversity of crops to avoid losing your whole season to one pest, blight, drought, or disease. Monoculture is not always a good idea. After we were done talking, we thanked them and headed back to Fresh Pond.

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